9 Comments

  1. Darby Hinshaw
    February 24, 2017 @ 9:05 pm

    Two thousand people probably disagree with this review, judging from the audience’s enthusiastic response, and the orchestra’s tremendous energy.

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  2. Peter D
    February 26, 2017 @ 6:43 am

    I have also been puzzled by this review and a similar one in the SDUT. In the post-concert interview, Danzmayr commented on how it is important to play this music on the edge and this is also what I have head that night. I have noticed that a few musicians in the orchestra applauded him at the end and I suppose that they must have liked playing with him. Also a good sign.

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  3. Ken Herman
    February 26, 2017 @ 7:56 am

    I applaud the San Diego Symphony’s efforts to bring new audiences to hear the orchestra play, and they filled this non-subscription concert hall. Bravo! Yes, this audience was excited by the Beethoven Seventh Symphony–it is that kind of work. But the more important matter at hand–now that the current Music Director Jahja Ling is leaving at the end of the spring–is evaluating the numerous guest conductors who have been chosen to grace the San Diego Symphony podium. Some, perhaps all, are being considered as the next Music Director, so evaluating their skill on the podium is the issue. In my opinion, maestro Danzmayr proved less skilled as a conductor than most of the guest conductors we have experienced over the last two years, from the esteemed Edo de Waart to younger conductors such as Mirga Grazinyté-Tyla, Cristian Măcelaru, and Lahav Shani, to mention just a few who come to mind.

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  4. Peter D
    February 26, 2017 @ 3:37 pm

    Yes and this is also how I read both reviews. The fact that the two local critics who reviewed this concert didn’t like it is worth pondering for the San Diego Symphony management, but so is also the fact that a lot of the musicians seemed to have enjoyed working with Danzmayr to the point that one of them felt compelled to defend him both times in the comment sections of said reviews. And when it comes to judging the skills of a conductor, it seems to me that nobody is better suited than those who play under him.

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  5. Ken Herman
    February 27, 2017 @ 12:18 am

    This is not always the case. When Lorin Maazel took the post of Music Director of the New York Philharmonic, he was the overwhelming choice of the players. They loved him. Yet his tenure turned out to be the most lackluster in the 2nd half of the 20th century for that (once) illustrious orchestra.

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  6. KMW
    March 3, 2017 @ 7:20 pm

    Martin Bernheimer’s most recent review of the NY Phil w/Gilbert cnducting: it’s the acoustics, not the muscians.

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  7. Ken Herman
    March 4, 2017 @ 7:18 am

    Bernheimer has been reviewing for so long–centuries it seems–that he is easily distracted. Perhaps he is just tired of writing about music but can’t kick the habit.

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  8. Kraig Cavanaugh Kraig Cavanaugh
    March 4, 2017 @ 2:54 pm

    The SD Symphony continues to surprise us with very good “live performances” under the batons of all these guest conductors. It has indeed been very pleasant and exciting to experience. I wonder if having perpetual guest conductors rather appointing a permanent maestro could be a viable option for the organization’s musical vitality?

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  9. Ken Herman
    March 4, 2017 @ 6:05 pm

    Kraig, there is something to be said for the kind of discipline a resident conductor brings to an orchestra. Much of the improvement of the San Diego Symphony in the last decade–not all, but a good portion–has come from Ling’s steady tutelage of the orchestra, something that only comes from regular work with an ensemble. He has also been a positive influence in selecting new hires, especially first-chair players. His favorite repertory mostly bores me, but it would be churlish to gainsay his effect on the caliber of playing we now enjoy from the orchestra.

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