6 Comments

  1. Jon Rigney
    July 28, 2012 @ 4:39 pm

    The reviewer sounds more interesting than the show. What an eclectic and risqué life she seems to lead.

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  2. Kata Pierce
    July 28, 2012 @ 5:32 pm

    You are a humorous and thoughtful reviewer. Very well-written. You understood my show in its characters and imagery. It doesn’t matter that you are not a fan of Butoh. I loved the review with its integrity and insight.

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  3. John Diaz
    July 30, 2012 @ 5:50 pm

    A truely wonderful, witty, and insightful review. The territory of this work was indeed difficult to navigate, yet your words are on target.

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  4. San Diego pubs Duluth’s Club Saratoga | Eh? Plus
    August 1, 2012 @ 7:22 am

    […] a burlesque show at a San Diego strip club? The Canal Park spot gets a mention in a dance review on sandiegostory.com. The ’Toga was used to provide context for the reviewer’s knowledge of nude dancing, as it was […]

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  5. Kata Pierce
    August 1, 2012 @ 11:19 pm

    The last day of La Femme Tragique performance, a man approached me and said he had heard me speak in 1990 as the guest speaker for a political party dinner at the Kona Kai Club. He had seen my promo card at San Diego Stage and Lighting, and remembered my long ago presentation, entitled “Sex, Lies and Videotapes.” Now, 22 years later, he was again in the Sunday audience to which I had just remarked that the next La Femme Tragique, Part 2 in a trilogy, would be a little bit more political. And yes with the relevant nudity you would expect at a strip club…AND in the political arena as well, maybe not as surprising today as it was in 1990. All that aside, I want to share his reaction to the show (via email):

    Sunday’s performance was a mind-blower- I knew it would probably be worthwhile, but I wasn’t expecting it to be that good. It managed to be very emotionally potent without any melodrama or obvious narrative elements- very surreal and dream-like. It seemed old, like something that might have been staged at Cabaret Voltaire in 1916, and it also reminded me a bit of an old experimental film by Kenneth Anger I recently saw at the art museum in downtown L.A.

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  6. Barbara McGehee
    August 2, 2012 @ 2:14 pm

    In my own experience, Butoh is certainly an acquired taste! After watching a Butoh-inspired film called “Cherry Blossoms.” which illuminated the deep meanings of this dark dance for me., Butoh suddenly took on a deeply emotional connotation for me. Now I am finding the same thing to be true of Les Girls. On my first visit there, I found it to be dark and the grinding dancing to be, well, shocking to my Southern Baptist sensibilities. However, watching La Femme Tragique I perceived the venue as a charming old theater with deep roots in San Diego history. The lights that encircled the stage created an intimate setting for this intense performance. I was charmed by each one the performers. Kata and Charlene created a powerful visual beginning to the show. Society Lady Mary provided a wonderfully disapproving character as the object of taunting by the sexy and sensual Minaqua, and Lizzy, as The Feathered Angela, was seductive and saucy as the French burlesque icon. The always magnificent John Diaz blazed across the stage as the Aztecan Bird God. I thought the nude, fair-skinned Tragic Angela performed beautifully as the vision of despair and lost innocence. Sarah and Charlene performed a very moving duet of a dance that was quite beautiful to see. I also thought that Anne brought her usually insightful performance to her character. I won’t forget the many outrageous expressions that crossed Kata’s face that evening – especially as she was chuckling and bouncing about and then later as she bared her breasts triumphantly and unrepentant at the end of the show. Bravo!

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